The Equal Rights Center: Disability Game

| Tuesday, April 12th, 2011 | Comments Off on The Equal Rights Center: Disability Game

 

Recently the Equals Rights Center launched a campaign to try and educate the public about what ADA Accommodations means.  They have a series of photographs depicting violations, the idea being that you can look at these photos and guess at what constitutes a violation.  They explain what is a violation in each of these images.

This campaign is in line with our mission statement as a company.

We are of course, contributors to their content.

I have quoted the campaign below.

 

WASHINGTON, D.C., April 12, 2011 – The Equal Rights Center (ERC), a national non-profit civil rights organization, and the D.C. Office of Human Rights, an agency of the District of Columbia government that seeks to eradicate discrimination, have launched a new multi-faceted campaign, “what is WRONG with these pictures?”

“One in five people in the United States have a disability, yet there is still a great lack of awareness when it comes to what exactly is accessible and what is not,” explained Leah Maddox, ERC Communications and Outreach Associate. “This campaign is a fun and stimulating forum through which people with and without disabilities can learn more about accessibility.”

The PSA campaign uses the website, www.disabilitygame.org, to create an interactive forum for education. The focus of the site is a game in which users are asked to identify physical barriers in real life situations. The photographs present a range of barriers; both easily recognized ones – such as a step in front of a doorway – and those many may not be so familiar – such as a round doorknob.

The tools presented on the site are part of a larger self-advocacy ERC initiative. Robyn Powell, ERC Disability Rights Manager, noted: “It’s important that people with disabilities know how to be their own best advocate. These pictures, and the accessibility information that goes with them, are just the start of that conversation.”

ERC member and campaign contributor Gregory L. Hubert, explained, “Advocacy… is part of the fabric of our family life. Often progress is frustratingly slow, but we know we are making a difference. We have been blessed by the advocacy efforts of those who have gone before us. We honor their efforts by continuing our efforts.”

The website also features the stories of people with disabilities as they encounter accessibility barriers in their daily lives. Jill A. Nerby, ERC member and campaign contributor, said, “By sharing my experiences and successes in my life, I hope to inspire every person with low vision and legal blindness to know that there is hope for the future, ways to overcome challenges, and that by working together, we can make a difference in the lives of many.”

Also featured on the site are quick links to the ERC’s five disability advocacy and self-advocacy toolkits, ways in which anyone can become involved in disability rights, and access to help for those who feel they have experienced discrimination. The campaign includes a two-month roll out on social media sites, and a three month print advertisement campaign.

To view the campaign, visit www.disabilitygame.org.

Original Link here:  http://www.equalrightscenter.org/site/PageServer?pagename=pr_11_04_12

 

You can go their image library here:   http://www.equalrightscenter.org/site/PageServer?pagename=disabilitygame_image

I invite you to take a look, it’s quite interesting.

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